Posted on

‘It’s a little bit leave it’ … Sounds better with glottal stops.

A Liʔʔle Biʔ Leave Iʔ? (ʔ = glottal stop)

This track is chock full of colloquial words and phrases. It’s also a fantastically all-out track performed in an ‘Estuary English’ accent. Estuary is an accent spoken in the southeast of England and it’s growing massively as a key accent at work, play and in the media. Key Estuary features are all over this track. For clarification and detail about Estuary English and the glottal stop, please follow this link to our sister site Pronunciation-Pro UK.

I also love it because I don’t understand some of the expressions myself. Perhaps I’m just not familiar with them. Or perhaps they made some of them up (created them themselves) because they sounded good musically. I see it as an example of the close link between the sounds of a local accent and the sounds of local expressions.

See below for a few interesting local words … Maybe I should jusʔ leave iʔ.

 

ChrisandKemVEVO (Published Oct 2, 2017)

A few of the interesting idiomatic or colloquial words and phrases in the track:

slip – make a mistake

ting – thing (not a standard in Estuary or received pronunciation but more in rap music)

leave it – stop; don’t try; go away

a hater – a social ‘adversary’; a critic; someone who they think envies them 

quick – intelligent

outta – out of (10/10 = ten out of ten; ‘ten outta ten’)

paps – paparazzi

mix with the greats – socialise/network with the famous people in their field (in rap)

off the top of my/your head – spontaneous thinking/speech without pre-planning

mash up – here it means cause chaos in a club or party through by introducing excitement and great energy 

smash up – cause chaos in a club or party through by introducing excitement and great energy 

Posted on

Pronunciation Workout for the Day: Contractions 1

Use contractions e.g. ‘I’m’ (not ‘I am’) and ‘she’s got’ (not ‘she has got’) and transform how natural you sound. This is just a quickie 1-minute recording for you to listen to and repeat. Try recording yourself into your phone and listening back. Compare your pronunciation with the MP3. Check: Are your vowel sounds as powerful?

Posted on

Taster Accent and Business English sessions in December

Pronunciation & Accent Transformation for Non-Native Speakers – Free

Friday, Dec 16, 2016, 1:30 PM

Eagle Labs Incubator, Barclays Bank, Cambridge CB4 3AZ
28 Chesterton Road Cambridge, GB

9 Students Went

Pronunciation & Accent Transformation for Non-Native Speakers – 90 minutes -FreeDiscover some of the secrets to achieving a natural, native-like English accent.https://youtu.be/7aiadfnxUNAPronunciation & Accent Reduction Transformation includes a seminar in which you are given some of the key secrets behind native British English-sounding speech…

Check out this Meetup →

Business Interactions for Non-Native Speakers – Free

Friday, Dec 16, 2016, 3:30 PM

Eagle Labs Incubator, Barclays Bank, Cambridge CB4 3AZ
28 Chesterton Road Cambridge, GB

4 Students Went

Business Interactions for Non-Native Speakers – 80 minutes – FreeWe look at the story of a company which is famous for a good, bad or unique reason, for example Amazon, BP or perhaps a company with particularly strong ethics. Their story is the starting point for our discussions and you receive a business-related task to tackle in English.The sem…

Check out this Meetup →

Posted on

Advanced Pronuncition & Accent: Noticing weak sounds

To try to create a recording which contained natural, hesitant, fast speech features, I asked myself a spontaneous question and recorded my answer. I didn’t plan what I would say. The result is a lot of ‘a lot of’s! 🙂 Look at the transcript and try mimicking the weak, fast words and phrases in bold. Record yourself and compare with mine. How do your weak phrases sound different from mine?

How Cambridge Has Changed_Transcript